Searching for God in nature, photography, whiskey, books and art…. whatever rant I am compelled to voice

SNAPPLE LEAVES A COMMENT

This is a comment SNAPPLE just left on my blog for those of you who would like to hear from an FBI supporter’s take on the whole Anna Mae Aquash story. My response is below his.

On August 12, 2009 at 5:24 am Snapple Said:

Elizabeth,

Richard Two Elk has made a video that describes some things that happened when the AIM attacked the people at Wounded Knee.

I think you should hear his side instead of just listening to a woman who may be closely associated with the people who conspired in some crimes.

I have a number of posts about Two Elk, but you might want to see his new video.

The introduction of the Trimbach’s book is written by Mr. Two Elk. He writes about child abuse and alcoholism in the introduction. This book is based on Indian sources because it is Indians who witnessed the crimes or who were the victims.

I linked it on this post.

http://legendofpineridge.blogspot.com/2009/08/richard-two-elk-stolen-legacy-of.html

I think you are believing the lies that the criminals who killed Indians, FBI agents, and some young women and men at Wounded Knee told.

You write about abuse of women and children, but young women and girls were sexually assaulted and murdered during the take-over.

The lawyer for the AIM, Mark Lane, got money from the KGB. He was also the lawyer for the 900 people at Jonestown who were murdered. Mark Lane says he managed to escape that day. Only a few people weren’t poisoned or shot. Then Mark Lane–the AIMster lawyer who got money from the KGB–wrote a book that claimed the CIA killed those people.

Mark Lane got money from the Soviet KGB to make trouble and to discredit American security agencies like the FBI and CIA. We know this because a KGB archivist defected to the British with many years of notes he took on the documents in the KGB foreign intelligence archives.

Snapple,

You must not have read my posts or comments to James Simon very well. I do not just listen to Monica Charles…she merely suggested a book to read….I have been reading THE UNQUIET GRAVE by Steve Hendricks. I got hung up on the Jancita Eagle Deer story and wrote several posts about her. What do you think about Jancita Eagle Deer? Do you see her as just another lying drunk Indian woman who “got” what she asked for?

I in no way, shape or form support ANYONE who has raped or abused women or children…David Seals has spoken out against AIM leaders who treated women poorly…as has Monica Charles. (look up my posts on  Bernard Red Cherries. I have a victims statement from his step daughter on my blog. A fellow blogger was threatened by Autonomous AIM Where is the FBI??) The point is Snapple, you and James Simon  unconditionaly support those who who have either ignored or partaken in the abuse of women. As Monica Charles once wrote I see the law enforcement as public servants sworn to uphold the laws of the United States(she just plain mistrusts them). The FBI should have been protecting the rights of Native Americans and not just  those of the colonizers.

I am not mired in opinion of one side over the other. I do not blindly support the AIM or the FBI. The only people I blindly support are the victims…and not the ones crying over the loss of their material possesions at Wounded KneeII

My sympathies and prayers go to the children like MaryAnn Little Bear and Jancita Eagle Deer…and the countless others who did not seem to warrant the FBI’s attention in the terms of a thorough investigation. That bothers me more than the Anna Mae Aquash murder…Anna Mae Aquash was a woman who made it to adulthood and made her decision to be involved in activities that may or may not get her killed…she felt that what she was doing was right and good. I do not agree with nor do I condemn her actions…She was caught up in something that became beyond her control. However I do not hold AIM to higher standards than I hold the FBI.The only law enforcement agent that looks to be a hero in all of this is U.S.Marshal Colburn…he’s good looking too!

My concept of my history has been pulled out from under me with this Indian stuff…totally blows me away at 43? My attitudes toward law enforcement and the government has changed considerably not because they made mistakes or did stupid things or even because they plotted to exterminate Indians but because they continue to support the wrong minded thinking in 2009. 2009 ! ! ! (kind of like the racism we are seeing with the election of Obama) They refuse to recognize, take responsibility and hold accountable those who did not enforce the laws that they were sworn to uphold. AIM was a group of protestors that got out of hand…the FBI is a government agency who only investigated crimes on Pine Ridge and other reservations when it suited their racist, paranoid beliefs.

As for Richard ‘Two Elks….have you ever read alt.native??? This is what the FBI supports??? Seriously???? All any jury would have to read is a copy of him making fun of a woman who was sexually abused by her father that pretty much negates what he claims to be consern and support for Native women. I own a copy of AMERICAN INDIAN MAFIA  and I will get around to reading it. But being endorsed by Richard Two Elks and Bill Janklow….you guys are starting off on the wrong foot with me.

I am trying to finish THE UNQUIET GRAVE and it is difficult…they are in Oregon traveling with dynamite….It’s hard to read but this is not something that I can even discuss with you because you are 100 percent in support of genocide. I can’t even get James Simon to acknowledge that the government  was stearilizing Indian women in the sixties. His avoidance of the topic makes me believe that he thinks that these were the right actions…that Indian women are less than human. What about you SNAPPLE….do you unconditionally support all actions by the United States???

A few more things why do you hide behind the name SNAPPLE?

Why are the FBI supporters so concerned about Monica Charles sex life? That really bothers me..why is that thrown around? Do you hold women to differnet standards? Is there any proof of her having sex with Dennis Banks? She says she didn’t….and if she did why bring it up like she is a whore? How many women or men have you been with??? Why aren’t the sex lives of the FBI agents under attack or investigated or commented about?

Get that video of Richard Two Elks on youtube and I will put it on my blog and make it a whole post!

Oh and I haven’t heard of any young women being murdered at Wounded Knee….but with all I have been stuffing in my head…did I gloss over it?

I look forward to hearing your response.

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13 responses

  1. AIM reportedly murdered perhaps seven people during the occupation and buried them near the village. Several of these were young girls. A child was also sexually assaulted.

    They murdered several men, too. The only name that I know is Ray Robinson, a black man.

    It is in Trimbach’s book and based on the testimony of Crow Dog, who told this to another Indian.

    Here is some information about Crow Dog’s admissions.

    http://legendofpineridge.blogspot.com/search?q=crow+dog

    You can read Trimbachs’ book for 5 dollars in an e-version.

    http://outskirtspress.com/webpage.php?ISBN=9780979585500

    Much of the Trimbachs’ book is based on evidence gathered from Indian witnesses.

    You can search Trimbachs’ book for Norman Charles–Monica’s brother. He told Peltier about the two FBI agents.

    Monica was reportedly in a relationship with Dennis Banks.

    http://indiancountrynews.net/index2.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=30&pop=1&page=0&Itemid=108

    This article is Trimbach’s take on Hendrick’s book:

    This article appeared in the December 25, 2006 issue of News From Indian Country:

    Grave’s Mistakes

    Lately, there’s been much discussion about Pine Ridge history of the 1970s, or the version of it that militant members of the American Indian Movement (AIM) would have us believe. Most historical texts follow suit: AIM was essentially an altruistic group of folks somehow badgered into committing acts of mayhem and murder. Few have challenged the fiction largely because books which promote the myths are usually well received; the more fraudulent the better. At the top of the heap is Peter Matthiessen’s In the Spirit of Crazy Horse, best known for breathing life into the Leonard Peltier legend. Spirit slimed its way into mainstream acceptability, so that it is now considered common knowledge that the FBI defeated AIM with a secret undermining operation, while it railroaded Peltier into prison. About the only fact not in dispute is Peltier’s 1977 conviction for aiding and abetting the cold-blooded execution of FBI Agents Ron Williams and Jack Coler. If you believe Peltier’s boast, he shot Agent Williams in the face as he pleaded for his life.
    Shortly after meeting Peltier, Matthiessen proceeded to swallow just about every whopper Peltier and his prison buddies conjured up. Spirit opens with claims of a vast government conspiracy to orchestrate Peltier’s prison escape, to effectuate an FBI assassination. Why? Well, after apparently changing its mind about the permanency of two consecutive life sentences, the Bureau needed to eliminate the political threat posed by America’s “Nelson Mandela.” Matthiessen’s gullibility grew. On national television, he informed news anchor Tom Brokaw that Peltier’s alibi, the mysterious Mr. X—who had appeared wearing a hood over his head—was just too familiar with the crime scene not to be the real deal. “I don’t believe the guy could possibly be faking it,” assured Matthiessen. But—as we later learned—faking it he was, and the only newsworthy item at NBC was how easily Peltier and friends managed this trainable myth chaser.
    Now comes young Steve Hendricks, Matthiessen’s heir apparent to conspiracy theory and shoddy research. Hendricks’s book, The Unquiet Grave, enlarges the government plot against AIM with new falsehoods deemed necessary to protect the legacy. Think Matthiessen Lite: all the attitude, zero gravitas.
    Grave’s war against the FBI follows Spirit’s same damned-if-they do/don’t reasoning. If the FBI investigated serious crimes on the reservation, it was interference and harassment. If the FBI failed to investigate, it was callous indifference or, as Hendricks often suggests, a cover-up. Rather than show new insight into AIM’s well-kept secrets, Hendricks shows only that he is another partisan who dares not look at the takeover of Wounded Knee village or any other AIM-led disaster with a critical eye. The politics just won’t allow it.
    I should know, because I was there. While Hendricks was still learning to walk, I made the fateful decision to cordon off Wounded Knee, after AIM members and reservation outsiders looted the store, ousted the residents, and began posing as aggrieved villagers. The media bought it, and eventually, so did the history books. Hendricks informs that, earlier, U.S. Marshals had converged on the nearby BIA building in order to subvert an attempted impeachment of the tribal chairman. He either does not know or does not care to know that Marshals were sent to protect the building, after AIM threatened to do to that structure what they had done to BIA Headquarters in Washington.
    Grave is rife with similar falsehoods, owing to a persistent failure to reference informed sources. At the center of Grave’s mistakes, the Aquash murder investigation. Anna Mae Aquash was executed after AIM leaders found her “guilty” of being an FBI informant. As it turned out, AIM murdered the wrong person. Until her dying breath, Anna Mae remained a loyal member.
    Hendricks asserts the FBI did as much to cover up the murder as did AIM. For this, our first-time author must not only find proof but also motive. No problem. Hendricks relies on old FBI memos that show an investigation in progress, with Agents engrossed in formulating possible subjects. Evidence of conspiratorial mischief? How suspicious indeed, that more than one investigator visited the crime scene—at different times, no less.
    To be judged worthy of vindication, FBI Agents, not AIMers, must prove with documents and photographs and who knows what else, that their hands are clean. And of course, no investigator associated with the case meets the criteria of innocence. Hence, they must all be guilty, the rascals. Setting aside the imbecility of murderous AIMers somehow in cahoots with Federal Agents tasked with investigating them, Hendricks’s smoking gun of complicity is limited to report semantics, a few perceived statement inconsistencies, and horror of horrors, an assumed date discrepancy.
    That Hendricks had to pry some of these documents loose—vis-à-vis a lawsuit—only pricks him into more suspicions. What is not fully considered is why the government resists sharing details of a still active murder investigation with a pretentious upstart. Hendricks has no idea he is handing the guilty a new raft of alibis of the sort that has enabled them to escape justice for the better part of 30 years. If Grave is an indication of how thoroughly one book can muddle a murder investigation, officials are rightfully concerned.
    In the ultimate tale of good intentions run amok, Hendricks has become a de-facto accomplice to murder cover-up. Like Matthiessen before him, he sustains conspiracy enthusiasts with the same paltry journalistic standards that have lured readers into believing in Peltier’s innocence. But then, why should we expect anything better from a book Hendricks acknowledges Matthiessen helped him manufacture?
    Recently, Hendricks got into trouble because he reported a truthful aspect to the saga: the AIM murder of Wounded Knee’s Ray Robinson. AIM blowhard Russell Means reacted by knocking the peepers off Hendricks at a recent book signing. If he were true to his logic, Hendricks would have to attribute Russell’s bad manners to FBI undermining. This is, after all, the same reasoning he uses to excuse AIM’s sordid past.
    Interestingly, when Hendricks had the chance to ask me about topics he obviously needed help with, he passed—no sense ruining a good book idea. In any event, he ought to consider himself lucky. All he got was a shove. In the 1970s, many innocent people fared far worse.

    August 12, 2009 at 12:21 pm

  2. elizabethtool

    Thanks for the links SNAPPLE my spam blocker thinks that you are just that if you leave more than one link….I see you have as much of a problem reading as James Simon…I said I already bought AMERICAN INDIAN MAFIA as well as THE UNQUIET GRAVE and LOUDHAWK…all in due time. You have avoided many of my concerns about the FBI and the United States history and policy against Indians. As I have said before it is hard to take seriously those who seem to have an agenda. I am sure that what you write has some truth in its basis but it does not seem to be unbiased in the reporting of the whole story…Steve Hendricks has been more than critical and forthcoming about some of AIMs actions…on the other hand your silence seems to indicate your complacency, acceptance and approval of rape, murder and abuse of Indians…unless of course it is done by members of AIM…then you find it useful to proclaim your outrage and make your stand.

    gotta go to work….I will eagerly look forward to any sort of statement from you indicating that you have some sort of unbiased agenda!!!

    August 12, 2009 at 12:50 pm

  3. Dear Elizabeth,

    You wrote, “Get that video of Richard Two Elks on youtube and I will put it on my blog and make it a whole post!”

    I told you that you can link to the video on my post
    here

    http://legendofpineridge.blogspot.com/2009/08/richard-two-elk-stolen-legacy-of.html

    Two Elk’s video is here.

    Maybe Monica’s personal life is relevant because of her reported relationship with Dennis Banks (who was married to the witness Ka-Mook). Monica might have been jealous of Anna Mae. I don’t know what Two Elk said about that.

    Trimbachs’ book exposes AIM leader Dennis Banks as a prime suspect in the ordered execution of Canadian Indian and AIM activist Anna Mae Aquash. http://www.emediawire.com/releases/2008/1/prweb596752.htm

    Monica and Norman were reportedly involved in some bad things.

    According to Trimbachs’ book, Norman Charles was reportedly in Peltier’s car the day the two FBI agents were murdered and reportedly also shot at them.

    August 12, 2009 at 12:59 pm

  4. The FBI is against Indians. I think they are against AIM killers.

    The FBI’s first big case was the Osage Indian Murders.

    http://legendofpineridge.blogspot.com/2009/01/osage-indian-murders.html

    AIM tries to spread distrust of the FBI so Indians won’t cooperate with law enforcement. Crimes can’t be solved unless the people come forward and tell the FBI/police what they know.

    I think that Indians witnesses are coming forward and that is why Monica is scared.

    August 12, 2009 at 1:07 pm

  5. I meant to write that the FBI is NOT against Indians, but they are against AIM killers.

    August 12, 2009 at 1:08 pm

  6. Elizabeth-

    I hope you will post Mr. Two Elk’s video and report on what he said.

    August 12, 2009 at 1:48 pm

  7. elizabethtool

    Monica denies any relationship with Dennis Banks…I could care less who she slept with unless there is something juicy to report like Dennis Banks had three penis or something…I understand he was like the Indian Jimmy Page…lots of women willing to sleep with him and to be beat up. Hopefully he has grown up enough to treat women with the respect that they so richly deserve

    August 12, 2009 at 7:23 pm

  8. elizabethtool

    Funny! I don’t know…. I think you slipped up and got the FBI sentiments right the first time! No comment on Jancita Eagle Deer yet

    August 12, 2009 at 7:26 pm

  9. elizabethtool

    Monica Charles scared??? Who said that? Pissed off….stubborn as a mule…angry….but scared??? Do you want to know what I have observed? I always know when some decision has been made in the trial of John Graham because Richard Two Elks goes berserk on alt.native. Every single time. I assume it is because he gets information before the lawyers put it up?? I know that there is a lot of nonsense on alt.native (one of them accused me of being an FBI agent! So you can now address me as Special Agent Tool! They also suspect that I am really Monica Charles who is also suspected of being an agent!) Speaking of which I believe that Richard has also accused Monica of being Informant A or B…getting Anna Mae killed. Now there is someone else who says the gun was small…and Monica pulled the trigger! He is one of Richard Two Elks friends.

    Look Snapple this is very confusing for me….but you can be rest assured that I change my mind with every bit of new information…I will always apply what is right to all parties involved and my previous posts are evidence of this…my question to you. Is there anything about the FBI’s conduct or lack of conduct on Pine Ridge in the 60’s and 70’s that bothers you at all???

    August 12, 2009 at 7:38 pm

  10. elizabethtool

    I will make a post of it when I have time…it depends on how long it is…I may have posted on this already. I wanted the youtube link because people will be more inclined to watch it if it is in front of them….links people get lazy. Huge difference.

    August 12, 2009 at 7:40 pm

  11. You are obviously a stupid little idiot who is not able to argue honestly if you choose to make something of an older person’s typing error. And lazy and dishonest not to post TWo Elk’s recent video.

    I have given you the youtube link a few times.

    Monica and Anna Mae both were both reportedly in a relationship to Dennis Banks, although he was married to Ka-Mook.

    Monica’s brother Norman was allegedly with Peltier when the FBI agents were shot.

    Monica is pretty much at ground zero and spends a lot of time discrediting Indians such as Richard Two Elk and Ka-Mook, who have told the authorities what they witnessed so that there would be evidence to take to court.

    Here is something Two Elk said about what Dennis Banks ordered boys to do during the occupation:

    “I was there, at Wounded Knee. At the age of 19, I backpacked weapons and supplies into the village with my AIM brothers. I remember it was near Easter, because that’s when our leader, Dennis Banks, ordered us to ‘take care’ of a young white guy, suspected of being an informant. We knew what that meant. We strung him up on a cross in a mock crucifixion, and beat him. After we took him down, they led him away and I don’t think he was ever heard from again.”

    http://www.expertclick.com/NewsReleaseWire/ReleaseDetails.aspx?ID=26541

    Agnes Gildersleeve testified that Indian people were held in a church and threatened with guns. AIM took over a disabled man’s trailer and other people’s homes.

    Agnes recounts:

    “[AIM] took complete control of the telephone service and local residents were not permitted to answer any of the phones. When my phone would ring, an armed guard would immediately answer the phone and direct the call over to [disabled Wilber Reigert’s stolen] trailer house where Banks, Means, and Bellecourt were located…” (Trimbach p. 88)

    August 13, 2009 at 4:46 am

  12. Elizabeth,

    You wrote:

    “Is there anything about the FBI’s conduct or lack of conduct on Pine Ridge in the 60’s and 70’s that bothers you at all???”

    No. The conduct of the AIM lawyer Mark Lane bothers me.

    He got money from the Soviet KGB and later “managed to escape” when over 900 people were murdered at Jonestown.

    Then Mark Lane wrote a book blaming the CIA for the murders at Jonestown.

    Withoug the FBI, Wounded Knee might have been the same with the criminals who led AIM and their lawyer Mark Lane, who had a relationship with KGB journalist/operative Genrikh Borovik, the brother-in-law of Kryuchkov, the KGB chief who led the coup against Gorbachov.

    The FBI kept many people from dying. They kept the violence from spreading to the whole reservation. They turned back a Soviet “journalist.” The AIM murdered about seven people in the area they controlled.

    They are no different than Charles Manson.

    August 13, 2009 at 4:56 am

  13. You called me an “FBI supporter.” Actually, I am on the side of the victims of the AIM terrorism, many of whom are Indians. I think the FBI and prosecutors are getting to the bottom of these AIM crimes.

    August 13, 2009 at 5:39 am

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